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Outputs

2021

Human Trafficking Research Network Report

In February 2021, members of the Human Trafficking Research Network (part of the Human Rights Centre) submitted a report to the UN Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially women and children. The report was compiled in response to a call for input for the report (to the UN Human Rights Council) on the implementation of the non-punishment principle. The report was produced by HTRN-affiliate members: John Trajer (PhD candidate, EUI), Sarah Craig (Lecturer, QUB), Marta Minetti (PhD candidate, QMUL) and Gillian Kane (PhD candidate, QUB).

Queen's University Belfast Human Rights Centre HTRN Submission

 


QUB HRC Modern Slavery Submission

In January 2021 students and staff affiliated with the School of Law and Human Rights Centre submitted a report to the Northern Ireland Department of Justice’s ‘Consultation on Tackling Modern Slavery’. The aim of the consultation was to engage stakeholders in building a strategy for Northern Ireland to eradicate modern slavery through  a collaborative partnership between law enforcement agencies, front line professionals and the general public to raise awareness of human trafficking and slavery-like offences, support victims, and bring offenders to justice.

The HRC’s report contextualises modern slavery in Northern Ireland, explores definitions of modern slavery and human trafficking, considers the particular challenges of business supply chains and identifies ways to enhance victim protection and support in Northern Ireland. The report was led by PhD candidates (Gillian Kane, Samantha Hopkins, Adedayo Akingbade and Daniela Suarez Vargas) students (Hannah Brown, Esther Weir, Stefania Garlicka, Antonia Boorman, Annie Kennedy, Ellen Walsh, Ellen Dalzell, Imogen Quinn, Matthew Torrens, Yi Kang Choo, Jenneka Bouchard, Fernanda Alves de Oliviera, , Laura Duran, Ellen Kearney, Janine Geddis, Anne Kelly, Sherwin Shaji John and Charlotte Wood), and supported by Human Rights Centre staff (Dr Amanda Kramer, Dr Ciara Hackett, Ms. Sarah Craig and Dr Rachel Killean). 
 

2020

In December 2020 students and staff affiliated with the School of Law and Human Rights Centre submitted a student-led report to the Northern Ireland Department of Justice’s public consultation on ‘Consent to serious harm for sexual gratification: not a defence’. The consultation document explained that: 

‘In light of the inclusion of the amendment to the Domestic Abuse Bill in England and Wales, and the increased prevalence of the use of the ‘Rough Sex’ defence, the time is right to have a discussion about the law as it stands in Northern Ireland.  We seek your views on whether a change to the law is required and, if so: what the change should be; and whether you think there is a need for a parallel programme of education to address this type of offending at the outset’.  

In response to these specific questions, the student-led HRC submission exploresthe complexities of this area of law and situates them within social and cultural narratives around sexual violence, ultimately proposing legislative changes coupled with robust sex education. This submission was led by students (Justyna Granacka, Daniel Watson, Rebecca Poots, Meghan Hoyt, Alannah Faulkner, Emer Smyth, Laura Martin Rosemary Cowan, Alexandra Cook, Cameron Chisim, Sara Racicot, Timothy Carson, Antonia Boorman, Nicolas Saddler), and supported by Law School staff (Dr Eithne Dowds, Ms. Sarah Craig, Dr Elizabeth Agnew). 
 
 
Human Rights Centre
Human Rights Centre